Friday, June 30, 2006

Hearsay

I'm fortunate to have good friends, who understand my schedule, because I only know the following story from an account given me this afternoon. Apparently, yesterday evening, one of my friends called me up, and our conversation went something like this:

"So, Nathan, what are you up to?"

"I'm in my room"

"Uh, great, are you interested in coming to grab dinner?"

"I have to...to...get out of bed. Good bye." *click*


I have no memory of this conversation. None. Normally, when someone tells you something like this, you dimly remember talking on the phone, and some of the details come back to you. Here, I'm at a complete loss. I was positive that I was asleep from when I got home around 4 until dinnertime around 8, and then back to bed (It's been a long week) But apparently, I had a curt discussion with my best friend at school and I don't remember. I thought he was pulling my leg, but no, he's serious.

I wonder if this sort of thing happens in intership as well.

4 comments:

S. Lee said...

were you there when i was *apparently* woken up during college and the freak snowing in San Antonio? One of my roommates saved me a snowball, but they swear that they had a cohesive conversation with me that I swear never happened.

wild.

on another note, the word verification seems to be getting longer. soon it will look like a 128-bit WEP key in hexadecimal.

mreddie said...

That's interesting, I've heard of sleep walking - but sleep talking? I do remember my kids doing this years ago and not remembering any of it. ec

medstudentitis said...

I am known for my ability to have coherant conversations in my sleep and then later not remembering a thing. This ability got me in lots of trouble in highschool when my mom would come in and ask me to do things for her and then I wouldn't remember the next day. I can only see it getting worse in the future when I go to treat a patient in the middle of the night and then forget that I ever saw them.

Nathan said...

Haha. One can only hope that the coherency translates into the right choices for treatments you suggest. Because I'll take not remembering the patient, killing them would be entirely another matter. But of course, that's why we're told to "go see the patient" which would presumably wake us up, and then if that fails, we're at least drilled so hard on the facts now that we can recite them in our sleep.